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George Medal

The George Medal (GM) is the second level civil decoration of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth. The GM was instituted on 24 September 1940 by King George VI  At this time, during the height of The Blitz  there was a strong desire to reward the many acts of civilian courage.

2The existing awards open to civilians were not judged suitable to meet the new situation, therefore it was decided that the George Cross and the George Medal would be instituted to recognise both civilian gallantry in the face of enemy action and brave deeds more generally.

Announcing the new award, the King said: “In order that they should be worthily and promptly recognised, I have decided to create, at once, a new mark of honour for men and women in all walks of civilian life. I propose to give my name to this new distinction, which will consist of the George Cross, which will rank next to the Victoria Cross, and the George Medal for wider distribution.”

More information
The Warrant for the GM (along with that of the GC), dated 24 January 1941, was published in the London Gazetteon 3 January 1941.

The medal is granted in recognition of “acts of great bravery.” The GM was originally not issued posthumously, however the warrant was amended in 1977 to allow posthumous awards, several of which have been subsequently made.

The medal is primarily a civilian award; however The George Medal may be awarded to military personnel for gallant conduct which is not in the face of the enemy.  As the Warrant states:

The Medal is intended primarily for civilians and award in Our military services is to be confined to actions for which purely military Honours are not normally granted.

Bars are awarded to the GM in recognition of the performance of further acts of bravery meriting the award. In undress uniform or on occasions when the medal ribbon alone is worn, a silver rosette is worn on the ribbon to indicate each bar. Recipients are entitled to the postnominal letters GM.

The details of all awards to British and Commonwealth recipients are published in the London Gazette.

Honoured

Lt G. Allen
Posted in the London Gazette on the 5th May 1944.Awarded for work at Salerno.

Lt J.G. Allen spent a week in Salerno; he defuzed and removed seven British bombs with long delay fuses and anti handling devices. These bombs were causing problems for military operations as they were next to the Salerno- Naples road and railway. They could not be destroyed in situ or be allowed to explode due to the damage to routes of supply it would cause. The normal mode of operation for this type of bomb would have been to destroy in situ.The week previous to these actions Lt Allen and a section of 17 Bomb Disposal Company, cleared two Barracks of booby traps after 25 American soldiers were killed.

Arthur James Ashmore
2009340 Sgt Arthur James Ashmore. GM 3 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.

Awarded for work at Grimsby. Sgt Ashmore was one of seven people awarded the George Medal for work between the 13/14th June 1943, whilst clearing SD2’s (Butterfly Bombs).He dealt with one SD2 which was located under a railway wagon, the cargo of which was valuable. This SD2 was sandbagged in such a way that when detonated the blast caused no damage to wagon and goods. Using the same method he disposed of another SD2 close to a signal box, without putting it out of action.Ten day’s later; a SD2 was located over a false ceiling, hanging by its drogues. To get to this device he had to rig tackle from the chimneystack to pull it clear. It in fact jammed and Sgt Ashmore had to climb back on the roof to free it. On climbing down and pulling it, the SD2 exploded.

William Henry Bailey
123013 Capt Alexander George Bainbridge. GM.

Royal Engineers Bomb Disposal.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.

Awarded for work in London.Monk Street, Woolwich, Southern Outfall Sewer, September 1940and High Street, Plumstead, October 1940.More details to be added when available.2nd Lt James Barnes.No 4 Bomb Disposal Company.Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 January 1941.Awarded for work at the Vauxhall Motor Factory, Luton.2nd Lt Barnes was called to the Vauxhall Motor Factory at Luton, on the 6th November 1940. The factory had been hit by ten bombs during the preceding night. Damage was superficial; however two bombs had failed to detonate. One of these bombs was located next to a furnace in the continuous heat treatment plant. This plant was vital to production. If this bomb had exploded production would have ceased for at least ten days. Due to the importance of the department Barnes immediately dealt with and removed the bomb.The raid had only happened two and a half hours before Barnes arrived. The A.R.P control centre had been damaged by two bombs, the second of which lay close by. Any further damage to this centre would result in 9,000 workers being laid off. Barnes with no hesitation excavated the bomb and removed the fuze, therefore preventing it exploding and causing further damage.Lt Barnes was awarded the GM for his heroism, it was his cool and courageous action that saved the company from losing production, important to the war effort. The factory was back in production by the next morning.Lt P.A. Bays.Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th October 1945.Awarded for work in the United Kingdom.Further details to follow when available.

Alexander George Bainbridge
2126849 Sgt William Henry Bailey. GM.

 7 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 10th March 1944.

Awarded for work in Plymouth.Sgt Bailey assisted Lt Grey, (also awarded the GM), on removing a 500kg bomb dropped on the night of 11/12 August 1943. This bomb landed tail first on the corner of Efford Road, Plymouth. This road was the main route from Plymouth to Exeter,  this bomb effectively sealed of Plymouth from the East, as all other routes were closed due to bomb craters or other unexploded bombs.The bomb was partially uncovered and on investigation the fuze was found to be a ticking number 17. As it was partially uncovered the decision was made and passed down that an attempt to remove it was to be made. The task was made even more daunting by the fact that another bomb from this stick had exploded at 06:00 that same morning. Also the bomb had partly demolished a building and the remains were overhanging it, in fact this was roughly a one hundred weight piece of concrete,  only held by a couple of pieces of metal reinforcement. Due to the fragile nature of the concrete shoring was not possible so work commenced with the possibility of it becoming detached and falling on those below working on the bomb.Finally there was another danger added to the equation, three feet away was a fractured gas main.The task took four hours, with Sgt Bailey working in shifts with Lt Gray, as the effects of the gas was felt upon them. Between them they cleared debris to get to the fuse, the bomb being unsecure threatened to move at any time. The 50 fuze was immunized, the bomb loaded onto a truck, with the 17 fuse still ticking and taken to a bomb dump where it exploded some hours later.

William Owen Bean
2968034 Cpl William Owen Bean. GM.

77 Bomb Disposal Section.

10 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.

Awarded for work at Middelton, Lancashire.Based in Manchester, on the 31st August 1941 he and his section were called to a railway embankment at Middelton, Lancashire. Where several bombs had landed, eight had failed to detonate and were close to a highly populated area.Digging began, however the ground was found to be hard going.Bean, by his leadership, quick thinking and coolness were an example to his men and he kept his section going and all eight bombs were recovered, allowing several hundred people to return to their homes.This award of the George Medal to a Junior Non Commissioned Officer was one of very few.

Alfred John Biggs
56967 Capt Alfred John Biggs. GM.

9 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 January 1941.

Awarded for work at Curzon Street, Bordesley, Birmingham.On the 1st November, at 01:30 in the morning a 250kg bomb fell through the railway viaduct at Curzon Street. Capt Biggs of 9 BD Company was informed 15 minutes later. He went to investigate this report with his Sgt; they found the bomb had partially buried itself under the viaduct. If this bomb exploded the damage it caused would have caused serious disruption to rail traffic for a considerable time.Capt Biggs set to uncovering the fuse straight away, which was ticking. On attempting to remove the fuse it was found to be jammed. Therefore Briggs removed the base plate with a hammer and cold chisel and removed the explosive with a hosepipe and crowbar. The explosive fill was removed by 02:30, seven minutes before the fuse detonated.For his coolness and bravery Capt Briggs was awarded the George Medal.

Thomas Blackshaw
210258 Lt Thomas Blackshaw. GM.

22 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th August 1943.

Awarded for work at sites in Mountnessing, Essex.On the night of 3/4th March 1943, 346 S.D.2’s, (Butterfly Bombs) were dropped on Essex. These were fitted with two fuses a No 70 B, anti handling, designed to detonate at the slightest vibration or touch, the other a No 67, designed to explode any time up to half an hour. Due to bad manufacturing the fuzes frequently stopped, shortly before it exploded. Therefore the Bomb Disposal personnel were left with an anti handling device to deal with. To make matters worse if one exploded it could cause a sympathetic detonation of others within a 25 yards radius.Disposal was completed by using one of two methods, either by attaching a cord to the device and pulling it from a safe distance or by placing a guncotton charge on it, both methods needed steady hands and nerve with a gentle touch. On the day of this raid Lt Blackshaw disposed of 31 S.D2’s all of which were armed with anti handling devices. For a further 48 hours, Blackshaw dealt with other S.D.2’s accounting for another 64 in this period. For sustained courage, in dealing with a total of 95 S.D.2’s in such a short period of time, where each device was of a significant risk he was awarded the George Medal.Lt T.W.T. Blackwell. MBE.No 127 and 128 Bomb Disposal Sections.Posted in the London Gazette on the 6th November 1942.Lt Blackwell prior to taking over, Bomb Disposal in Malta in October 1941 on the death of Lt Talbot, had been awarded a MBE.Several delayed action bombs were dropped on the night of 30th July 1941. One fell in a populated area, burying civilians.Blackwell investigated and found it was fused by two No 17 fuzes, these were delayed action and were ticking. Due to civilians being buried it was decided to remove the bomb allowing rescue work to continue. The problem was no lifting gear and a bomb weighing 550lbs. The course of action tow, it away. Debris was removed with the assistance of PC Baylis; the bomb hitched up with a twelve foot rope and moved initially this failed, as debris got in the way. PC Baylis therefore drove and Blackwell cleared a route. The bomb was successfully removed to a safe place, during this time another of the bombs exploded. Sadly no buried civilians survived.Blackwell received the George Medal for this and other operations on Malta, for his untiring efforts and heroism throughout the worst of the Malta bombing.

W.S. Borthwick
LT W.S. Borthwick. GM.

11 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th December 1945.

Awarded for work at Dunbar.Whilst working on a mine field to the south of Dunbar, on the 27th April 1945, Lt Dunbar was called upon to attend a minefield to the north of the town, were an accident had occurred. On arriving at the incident Borthwick found that two mines had detonated and 3 Prisoners of War were died and nine others wounded and all were still in the minefield. Borthwick and Sgt H. Craik cleared a route enabling the wounded and dead men to be recovered. There were problems of communication due to the language barrier during these operations and the tendency of the wounded to move around as stretcher parties came near. Lt Borthwick was awarded the George Medal for “Operating, at great personnel risk, in a situation fraught with difficulties and by his own initiative and gallant act, ensured that the wounded men were recovered with greatest possible speed and sent to hospital”Prior to this incident Brothwick had spent a year clearing up to 1,600 mines.Sgt Craik was awarded the BEM for his part in the operation.Later that year Brothwick was tasked to a similar incident at Peffer Sands Minefield.

Edward Louis Bourne
154267 Temporary Capt Edward Louis Bourne. GM.

4 Bomb Disposal Company.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 23rd December 1943.

Awarded for work in Norfolk; Wells-next-on-the-sea 18th August 1943.Sheringham 24th August 1943.Swinton Abbot 25th August 1943.Elsing 2nd September 1943.Captain Bourne was involved in clearing of S.D.2’s (Butterfly Bombs). His Sgt Fred Fisher was awarded the BEM

John Brabin
1990980 Sgt John Brabin. GM.

 3 Bomb Disposal Company.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 15th September 1943.

Awarded for work on the Norfolk Coast January/May 1943, Caston  12th August 1943 and Norwich area September/October 1943.Sgt Brabin was involved in mine clearance work on the Norfolk Coast January to May 1943.Also Brabin cleared 27 S.D.2’s (Butterfly Bombs) dropped on Caston on the night of 11/12 August 1943. These were located on awkward positions, hedges, corn stukes and undergrowth. He also assisted in clearing more S.D.2’s dropped in September to October 1943. Over 600 were dropped in this area. Most were fitted with a 70(B) fuze (anti handling)

A.J. Briggs
Capt A.J. Briggs. GM.

11 Bomb Disposal Company.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 9th July 1946.

Awarded for minefield work at Dunbar.On the 14th September 1945 an accident happened in a minefield near Dunbar. The officer and three men were killed, Briggs recovered their bodies. The moral of the remaining men was badly shaken and the minefield was re-fenced. Work on the field was made more hazardous by rock formations affecting the locating equipment.On the 27 September, Briggs brought the survivors back to the minefield and alone in view of his men located and disarmed several mines. This restored the men’s confidence and work re-started on clearance operations. No further incidents occurred.Lt Briggs was awarded the George Medal for his unfaltering courage and devotion to duty in setting a fine example to his men.

Cpl Bristow
Placed in the London Gazette on the 17th February 1942.

Awarded for work at Gas works Romford and A13 road Rainham, Essex.Cpl Bristow assisted Lt J.P Walton on the 5th November 1940 in dealing with two 250kg bombs armed with both no 17 and 50 fuzes. These were in gasholders at the Romford Gas Works. The air conditions were so bad that work had to be stopped every twenty minutes. This work was completed in the shortest possible time, ensuring minimum damage and services to be  re-started with the least disruption. Also this work was carried out whilst the air raid continued.Also on the 26th to 28th February 1941, Bristow assisted Walton in dealing with three remaining  250kg bombs  of a stick of  four straddling the A13 at Rainham, Essex. One of this stick exploded after 18 hours. Work commenced on these bombs after a safety period of four days, they were fuzed with both No 17 and 50 fuzes. Two when uncovered were found to be ticking, but immunized successfully.

W.M. Brown
Placed in the London Gazette on the 15th March 1946.Awarded for work in the U.K.

2067513 Sgt Charles Morris Cann. GM.

8 Bomb Disposal Section.

4 Bomb Disposal Company.

 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1941.

Awarded for work at Ipswich, Suffolk on the 28th October 1940.Sgt Cann was the first Non Commissioned Officer to defuze live bombs also he was one of the pioneers in BD work.He under took work on parachute mines regardless of whether they had been defuzed by the Royal Navy. Whilst he was dealing with a mine in a back garden, the fuze commenced ticking. This had 17 seconds to run before exploding, therefore Cann ran for it, rumor has it that a tubby Cann managed to clear 6 garden walls before it went of, these walls were 6 feet tall, no mean feat. On the 28th October 1940, Cann was tasked with investigating a new fuze type on a small anti personnel bomb. Numerous of these had been dropped in the Ipswich area. He managed to secure a complete bomb, the mechanism was a hairbreadths from triggering the device. This was dismantled and rendered safe. Previous to this a number of policemen had been injured fatally by these devices. Due to the recovery of this device, precautionary measures were implemented, saving lives. In 1945 Cann now commissioned Captain, was involved in providing BD Operatives with safe methods of clearing beach mines laid in shingle. This was done and units working on the beaches were issued High Pressure Water Jetting Equipment.Sadly Cann died in 1945, not as a result of BD work but whilst having his tonsils removed, tragically his son died in 1946 whilst having the same operation.

John William Carter
1880745 Spr John William Carter. GM.

2 Bomb Disposal Group.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11th March 1941.

Awarded for work in Gravesend, Kent in continual support of Lt C.H. Green.In Gravesend, Sapper Green supported his officer on several incidents these included two 250kg bombs in a school playing field, a Flam 250 incendiary at Bowater Paper Mills, close to the River Thames and another bomb in a back garden in Dashwood Road. This last bomb was discovered with its fuze visible but so badly damaged as to be unidentifiable. Later it was found to be a no 17 Long Delay fuze, which was removed by hammer and cold chisel, standard practice at the time, the fuze fired ten minutes after removal.

Stanley Chesher
2006164 Spr Stanley Chesher. GM. 96 Bomb Disposal Section. Placed in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940. His Citation reads:The conduct of Sapper Chesher, under conditions of extraordinary difficulty and danger, has been especially meritorious.  He has never allowed considerations for his personal safety to interfere with his work and no situation, however perilous, has been able to affect his nerve. He has shown himself to be as ready to face hard work as he is to meet risk and it has been found more difficult to persuade him to come out of a bomb hole than to get him to enter one. On 18 August 1940 he worked for 9 hours, stripped and up to his waist in water, in order to reach a large High Explosive delayed-action bomb which had fallen in a pond.
Robert John Chester
Placed in the London Gazette on the 28th October 1941.

Awarded for three incidents:Harold Wood, Essex, August 1940.Railway Station, Hornchurch, Essex, September 1940. Warley near Brentwood, Essex, October 1940.Further details to be added when found.

Michael .A. Clinton
Lt Michael .A. Clinton. GM & Bar.

22 Bomb Disposal Company.

George Medal. Awarded for work in Romford, Essex.Placed in the London Gazette on the 17th February 1942.1. Based in Colchester, Clinton was tasked with immunizing and removing a 250kg bomb in Romford. This was fuzed with a no 17, the fuze pocket was damaged and the fuze could not be removed. The bomb had to be moved as disposal in situ was not acceptable. Whilst being lifted the fuze became active and ticking was heard, thankfully it stopped. But for how long was uncertain. After the bomb was lowered onto a truck, Clinton himself drove it away, to a area where it would cause no damage, this was completed before it exploded.2. On the 14th March 1941, Clinton located and uncovered a 250kg bomb. This had two fuzes, a normal 50 but a new version 17A, delayed action. This was possibly the first of these new fuzes to be discovered. Clinton took the decision to remove it for research. Due to the position of the bomb the fuze was underneath the bomb. Disregarding all safety precautions Clinton, removed by fuzes by hand in torchlight. Major General Taylor, commented on Clinton’s actions, stating that he had accepted the risk of certain death, with sustained courage and complete disregard to personal safety. At this time a Stethoscope could be used to hear if the fuze was ticking, but there was no equipment to stop the clock. Also there could have been a booby trap under the 17A fuze to stop it falling into enemy hands for research.For both these incident Lt M.A. Clinton was awarded the George Medal.Bar to GM. Awarded for work in Essex.Placed in the London Gazette on the 17th August 1943.Due to a raid at Sisted on the 6th March 1943 Clinton was dispatched and found 21 S.D.2’s (Butterfly Bombs). Some were buried 8 to 10 inches into the ground others were found on the surface. All were fitted with the type 70 (B) fuzes, anti handling. The surface bombs were detonated by having a piece of string attached and being pulled. Those buried had the earth around them cleared till explosive could be put in contact with them, then detonated.On the 7th March 1943, Clinton then disposed of 8 more West Thurrock and at Thames Haven oil refinery 10 more. These were fitted with the No 67 fuze, which was a clock work delay set for up to 30 minutes. Three of these at Thames Haven had to be moved as they had come to rest under oil pipes. For these incidents Clinton received his second George Medal. Only two officers were given this honor.

Reg .E. Cooke
Platoon Officer Reg .E. Cooke. GM. MBE.

Home Guard.Auxiliary Bomb Disposal Unit.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 11 March 1941.

Awarded for work in a factory at Birmingham.Cooke’s citation reads:Platoon Officer R.E. Cooke, of the Home Guard, went to deal with a 250kg bomb which fell on the factory in which he worked on 28th October 1940. When it was reached it was found to be ticking. The bomb had now been there for forty eight hours and from experience, it was known that the bomb could explode at any time. An attempt was made to remove the fuze, but it failed and he withdrew to consider the problem. In view of the importance of the factory it was decided to attack the fuze for the second time. This time he took a crow bar with him. In the end, it needed three people to extract the ticking fuze. This time they were partially successful, but only in pulling the fuze part way out of the bomb. It was then decided to flood the shaft and hope the water would stop the fuze. Apparently it did and the bomb was later safely removed.2nd LT R.H. Lee was also awarded the George Medal for this incident.Note: It is not well known that many large factories had their own BD units. These were there in case the regular BD units were unavailable. These units were called Auxiliary BD Units and were part of the Home Guard. they however,  wore RE cap badges and the treasured bomb badge on their sleeves. There training was from the local Regular BD Officers. There are numerous mentions of these units digging up and immunizing bombs in their factories.

J. Cooke
Sgt J. Cooke. GM. BEM.

Bomb Disposal Unit (UK).

Gilbert and Ellice Islands.October 1965 to May 1966.

Major Qualtrough and Sgt J. Cooke BEM, were tasked with a most hazardous overseas task. Initially on there way to Betio Island, they were to carry out a reconnaissance on Penang, of abandoned Japanese mine and bomb dumps. Part of Penang had been cleared in the 1950’s, however nine storage tunnels and hidden pits were discovered and contained a vast collection of mines and shells, many oozing explosives. Work went on in Penang till November 1965, when both men set of for Betio.The majority of explosives on Betio were found to be in fifty collapsed bunkers. Qualtrough and Cooke’s official task was to, clear the bunkers by hand and sea dump the contents, re-inter any body parts found and finally give the island a clearance sweep using mine detectors, a doubting task. A preliminary reconnaissance was undertaken on the 30th November 1965, forty two bunkers were located, some gun sites, others command posts and bomb stores. The collapsed bunkers contained shells for 203, 152, 157 and 76.2 mm caliber, also present were mines bombs and other ammunition. Work commenced on the 3rd December, locals were employed for the task alongside fifteen prisoners provided by the Chief Police Officer. By 19th January 1966 al bar one bunker was clear. The ammunition removed was in poor condition, some so badly deteriorated that it gave of toxic fumes. The local work force however was uninterested in safety often removing the explosive at night for private use. The final bunker was the most difficult, as it had suffered several direct hits through the war. Excavation began on 29th December 1965 but on 3rd February work ceased as the risks were too great, 20.3 tons had by now been removed. Sea dumping continued till 3 March 1966. In total over 100 tons of explosives were cleared from Betio, however much more remained. Both Major Qualtrough and Sgt Cooke were later awarded the George Medal.

D.W. Cunnington
Capt D.W. Cunnington. GM.

1st Canadian Pioneer Battalion.

Royal Canadian Engineers.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.

Awarded for an incident at Weybridge.At Weybridge Hawker Aircraft Factory,  on the 21st September 1940, at 10:30 in the morning three bombs were dropped, two exploded with causing slight damage, the third penetrated the roof passed through a wall and came to a halt on a concrete driveway, outside the assembling shed. If this bomb had exploded it would have caused damage both to building and aircraft that was irreparable.The 1st Canadian Pioneer Battalion stationed nearby, were asked for assistance, Lt Patten later followed by Cunnington looked at the bomb and towed it away to a safer area, where little damage could be caused if it exploded. It exploded later in the morning.Lt Patten was awarded the George Cross and Capt Cunningham the George Medal for showing complete disregard for his personal safety.

Charles Ernest Davies
127300 Lt Charles Ernest Davies. GM.

23 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th October 1941.

Awarded for incidents at:1. Hawker Aircraft Factory, Weybridge, Surrey, 21st September 19402. Onslow Village, Guilford, Surrey, 27th October 1940.3. Ormonde Road, Guilford, Surrey, 28th October 1940.4. Airspeed Factory, Muddiford Lane, Christchurch, Hampshire, 10th May 1941.1. Lt Davies, joined Bomb Disposal in August 1940 and was stationed at Winchester. In the first twelve months of BD work he dealt with four hundred bombs. Thirty Five of these had been categorized as Cat A, i.e. immediate disposal essential, bomb must not explode in situ, under any circumstance.One of these Cat A’s was at the Hawker Aircraft factory, Weybridge. Two 50 kg’s had been dropped at 10:30 in the morning. The first one that Davies dealt with was found when he arrived at 14:00 had not penetrated the concrete floor of the factory, this he moved to a crater in a nearby field. The second had penetrated the floor and had to be dug out. This operation took al night, at 08:00 hours the next day the bomb was reached. Both bombs were fitted with a No 17 long delay fuze. Whilst digging for the second bomb the first detonated. Due to the bravery of Davies and his men, working when they knew there was a strong possibility that they could be blown up at any time, 25 aircraft vital to the war were saved.2.  On the 27th October 1940 Davies was tasked with investigating a UXB at Onslow, near Guilford. The UXB was under a sewer and cables also pipes, carrying al the main services, in the rear garden of a private house. It was found to be a 250kg bomb, fitted with a no 17 fuze.  The fuze pocket was damaged making the removal of the fuze impossible. So it was placed on a truck and driven to a safe area to be disposed of.3. The next day 28th October 1940 saw Davies dealing with a 250kg bomb, armed with both a No 17 and 50 fuze. It had landed in the hallway of a house, mid terrace, and penetrated 16 feet then offset 12 feet i.e. it was under one of the houses. This was dealt with For these incidents and a further one at an  4. Airspeed Factory in Hampshire, May 1941, Davies was awarded the George Medal.

Ernest Arthur Deacon
166507 Capt John Ernest Arthur Deacon. GM.

27 Bomb Disposal Company.

Placed in the London Gazette on the 25th January 1946.

Incident at Automatic telephone exchange, Belfast.On the 25th October 1945, Capt Deacon was tasked to a bomb found at the automatic telephone exchange. This exchange serviced the Stormont building which housed the Northern Ireland Parliament and two other government buildings. The bomb was fuzed by both a No 50 and 17 fuzes. The 50 was immunized the 17 was stopped by using a magnetic clock stopper, so the bomb could be moved away from the building, as there was a risk of the 17 fuze detonating if it was removed. In transit the clock stopper was dislodged and was damaged. Therefore the rest of the journey was carried out with no means of stopping the 17 fuze.  The outcome was, the bomb arrived without detonating at a safe area and was disposed of, with no damage to property or personnel. Due to the speed that the operation was carried out, a large number of people who had been evacuated from their homes, returned before nightfall. Both Lt Deacon and Sgt Alfred Parker who assisted were awarded the George Medal.

Thomas James Deane
87982 Lt Thomas James Deane. GM.

22 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th February 1942.

Awarded for work at Romford Essex, August 1940.Great Braddow Essex, January 1941.Railway Gas Works 15th May 41 and Petrol Depot Aug 41 both at Saxmundham Essex.Lt T.J. Deane based at Colchester and with six or seven months BD service, resulting in around one hundred bombs being dealt with by him. was called to Great Baddow, in Jan 41. This call resulted with the locating of two 1000kg bombs being located. These were steamed out using high pressure steam. During this process there was a small explosion and the fuze extension cap blew off. Deane continued with the steaming operation. The extension cap on 1000kg bombs exploding was to be a continuing problem.In May 1941, was called to a incident at Saxmundham. On arrival four bombs were found, these were of the 250kg variety, which had fallen that evening. These were located in the Railway Yard, Gas Works and Petrol Depot. All four were classified as type A, i.e. under no circumstance was explosion in situ permissible. Work on all four started immediately. Instead of the normally expected 17 and 50 fuzes, these were found to be fuzed with the 25 Impact type. All were dealt with successfully.

Peter Denison
2068288 CQMS Peter Denison. GM

14 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 21st October 1941.

Awarded for two actions: Laing’s Shipyard Sunderland County Durham, 12/13 August 1940Sheffield Yorkshire 13/16 December 1940. No further details available at this time.

Kenneth Dickinson
Lt Kenneth Dickinson. GM

10 Bomb Disposal Section.

4 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd June 1941.

Awarded for an incident within the Shoeburyness Garrison Essex, 18 August 1940.Lt Dickinson was based with his section at Bury Saint Edmund, his citation sums up the bravery of all those serving in Bomb Disposal in the early days.His citation reads:”Lieut Kenneth Dickinson has been engaged upon Bomb Disposal duties since June 1940. On the 18th August an unexploded bomb fell within the confines of Shoeburyness Garrison. He immediately went to the spot and with the assistance of A Sgt and a Spr, despite the fact that there was a severe air raid on at the time they uncovered the bomb, placed it in a lorry and drove the dangerous cargo to a safer spot where he finally defuzed it and rendered it safe.”The whole operation was carried out under constant air raid conditions.

William Arthur Dixon
Capt William Arthur Dixon. GM, MC, AMInstCE

3 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941

Awarded for work at Sicilian Avenue Holburn London. 10th December 1940.On the night of 9th September 1940,  a bomb landed in Sicilian Avenue, Holburn. Capt Dixon inspected  it early morning of the 10th. The bomb had only just penetrated the pavement, was partly broken and laying near the surface. This bomb was causing serious problems with the traffic. Dixon decided to take immediate action regardless of the considerable risk, as the bomb was fitted with a No 17 fuze, which was ticking.Due to the distorted bomb casing there was no chance of stopping the clock, therefore the explosive fill was removed whilst the fuze ticked on. The operation was a success. This was one of over a hundred bombs that Dixon dealt with, including four category A’s.Dixon had been awarded the Military Cross prior to joining Bomb Disposal.

William Anderson Feather
119063 Lt William Anderson Feather GM, BSC.

4 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th October 1941.

Awarded for incidents at:Royal Naval Mine Depot Wrabness Essex, 21/23 August 1940.Explosives and Chemical Products Works Harwich Essex, 9/15 September 1940.West Raynham Airfield Norfolk, 28 October 1940.Massingham Airfield Norfolk, 29 October 1940.Bury Saint Edmunds Suffolk 17 July 1941.On the 2nd October 1940 a bomb landed in the Royal Ordnance Factory, this was given a A1 category. Work started immediately, the soil was of blue clay composition, difficult to dig and timber, this problem continued through out the war. This bomb took fifty one days to reach and immunise after digging three shafts, it was at thirty four feet depth and off to one side at a distance of 16 feet.Lt Butch Feather was a BD Officer from the begining, with 4 BD Company, based at Bury St Edmunds. Although at the time he was at Hornchurch working under very heavy raid conditions.21st August 1940, Butch Feather went to eleven UXB’s reported to be 50kg’s just outside the Royal Navy Mine Depot. Loaded sea mines were stored here. Even though these mines were within close proximity to the working area, Feathers supervised his digging teams for two days, on five bombs presenting the greatest risk to the mines. One was found to be fuzed with a long delay, this fuze was removed before it detonated.On the night of the 9/10 September, Feather went to ten category A bombs. These were in the works of the Explosives and Chemical Products Company, Harwich. On investigation three 500kg bombs and seven 50kg bombs were located.  Within fifty yards of most of these bombs was a gunpowder storage area, containg one ton of gunpowder.  With his men he worked for days whilst under constant air attack, andit was only  due to his tenacity and leadership, that the task was completed. All bombs immunised and work in the factory started in the minuim time possible.On October the 28th Feather was called to the RAF base at West Raynham, near Kings Lynn, where thirty five unexploded 50kg bombs were located. They had only just penetrated the ground. Feathers team worked quickly to uncover them and he removed the no 17 fuzes that they were armed with. He at the time had no knowledge of no 17 fuzes being fitted into the 50kg bomb. Due to their speed the airfield was back in operation  on the same day.The next day saw him at Massingham, dealing with two 250kg and one 50kg bomb. These were made safe by the fuzes being removed within three hours of landing , this was a great risk as the 250 kg bombs often were fitted with a booby trapped 17 fuze.

George Raymond Fletcher
377837 Maj George Raymond Fletcher, GM, MBE.

4 Bomb Disposal Squadron.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 21st April 1970.

Awarded for a incident on at building site at Burghely Road, Camden, London, on the 1/2 October 1968.No further details at this time.

James Ford
130518 2/Lt James Ford, GM

2 Bomb Disposal Group.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11th March 1941.Awarded for a incident at Bexley Mental Institution, Kent on the 18th October 1940.A large bomb had fallen into the Boiler House at the Bexley mental Institution. Lt Ford was tasked for the job. The bomb was located in the flue, the temperature was in excess of 100 degrees Fand the area was polluted with gas, making conditions difficult to work in. Ford however, displaying great courage and fortitude managed to render the bomb safe and arranged for its removal.

Samuel Garside
133006 Capt Samuel Garside. GM.

Divisional Officer.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.

Awarded for  incidents at: The river at McNeils Wharf, Barking Essex , 24 September 1940.High Road, Twickenham, Middlesex, 1941.Garside is credited with one of the fastest and safest disposals recorede. He with his Sgt went to investigate a reported UXB,  on arrival they found a clear pathway that the bomb had made through the ground, (called a trace).The bomb was a 500kg this was determined by the size of the entry hole, approximetly 24 inches. Garside probed the hole until he reached the tail fins. As they were in reach he tied a rope to them, betwen him and his Sgt they were able to pull the tail fins from the ground. When these were removed it left a clear shaft, using a long pole Garside pushed an explosive charge down onto the bomb, which they then detonated exploding the bomb below. Site cleared without having to get a shovel out.For this and other incidents he recieved the George Medal.

George. M. Gaylor
Lt George. M. Gaylor GM. 23 Bomb Disposal Company. Posted in the London Gazette on the 20th April 1945. Awarded for an incident at Hassault, France in the Albert Canal, on the 6th November 1944.Work on rebuilding a destroyed bridge onthe Albert Canal was halted on the 6th November, as a UXB was discovered 30feet under the water. Lt Gaylor, went into the canal in a diving suit. He located the bomb, half buried in mud a under torn rail lines, steel girders and general wreckage. To get to the UXB he had to squeeze between the girders putting his suit at risk of ripping and his air line fouling. His life line was also at risk of catching thus trapping him.He worked under nil visibility conditions, however with the aid of a torch he managed to identify the fuze. No existing immunisation equipment could work under water, so he removed the fuze live. Due to visibility he was unable to be 100% sure that there was no second fuze.  A rope was attached and the bomb lifted to the surface, where it was found to only have a single fuze. Construction work was now able to continue.
Lewis Gerhold
131777 Lt Lewis Gerhold GM AND Bar.

11 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941, GM and17 August 1943 and Bar.Awarded for incidents at;Royal Ordnance Factory, Bishopton Renfrewshire 4 Oct to 24 Nov 1940.High Level Rothsay Docks Isle of Bute 14 March to 3 April 1941.Tannockside Colliery Lanarkshire 9 to 12 May 1941.Essex 1943.Lt Gerhold was a lucky officer, when he recced a bpmb at a house in Bilbowie Road, Clydebank. It landed at 01.30 on the 14 March 1940, recced on the 15 March at 10.00 and detonated three hours later, before work commenced on it. On the 7th May  similiar luch held for Gerhold a bomb fell in the grounds of 49 Polworth Gardens it exploded at 10.10 before Gerhold arrived to do his recce.May 7th saw Gerhold and his men at Tannochside Colliery, where work had ceased due to a UXB. This task took five days of digging to reach the bomb, it was fitted with a 17 and 50 fuze. The 17 was Stopped and the 50 immunised. Then steam sterilized all completed by 12.00 on the 12th.Another task was dealing with a bomb dropped on the night 13/14 March1941 at NO 2 high Level Docks Rothsay. This bomb had penetrated to a depth of twenty two feet, when uncovered it was found to be fitted both with a 17 and 17A fuze. Tidal conditions affected water levels in the shaft throughout the operation. Due to working conditions this bomb was not rendered safe till the 3rd April.For these and many others Gerhold received the George Medal and Bar.

John Henry Havelock Gray
146273 Lt John Henry Havelock Gray. GM
7 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 10 March 1944.

Awarded for an incident at Efford Road, Plymouth, Devon on the 12 August 1943.During a raid on the night of 11 Aug 43, a 500kg bomb fell on the corner of Efford Road, this was the main route between  Exeter and Plymouth and had to be closed. The rest of the roads from the East into Plymouth were also closed due to bombs either being cratered or unexploded.The Efford Road bomb was found to have entered the ground tail first, it ha penentrated  a concrete path, of a building which had been hit and was partially demolished. The bomb was partly uncovered and one investigation it was found that it was fuzed with a 17 which was ticking. To make matters more dangerous, the partially demolished house was overhanging the bomb, right above it was a concrete slab wieghing about a hundredweight, only held by a few strands of metal reinforcement. This was so unstable that it could not be shore it up. Gas was also escaping from a nearby fractured main. As this bomb was on the surface it was and all othere routes blocked it was decided that it was to be dealt with. Lt Gray was given the task, another bomb from this stick had exploded earlier in the morning 06.00. Gray with  Sgt William Bailey, spent four hours between them clearing the debris around the bomb. When cleared they were able to uncover both fuses the 50 was immunised . The was still ticking when the bomb was loaded onto a truck and taken to a bomb cemetary, where it exploded shortly afterwards. Both Lt Gray and Sgt Bailey were awarded the GM for this action.Lt Gray dealt with a further nine bombs fitted with 17 and 50 fuses after this raid.

Clifford Henry Green
134891 Lt Clifford Henry Green. GM
23 Bomb Disposal Group.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11 March 1941.

Awarded for an incident at Dashwood Road, Gravesend, Kent on the 17 December 1940.Shortly after recieving BD training Lt Green was sent to investigate some reported UXB’s at Gravesend. On arriving he found the first two in a school playing field. Following standing instructions, not to remove the fuzes, just identify and note their details, these were surrounde with sandbags to direct the blast away from buildings and detonated. The craters were then filled in by the council. It was later discovered that the fuzing on these was of a long delay mechanism. The third UXB was in the Bowwater Paper Mills, near the River Thames edge. Due to its location it could only be worked on between tides. It was an incendiary, Flam 250. The up side of this job was meals in the works canteen and billets in the Staff Quarters. Good relations were formed between the men and the female staff. The Fourth was located in a back garden, it had been dropped at low level, landed in the road, hit an obstruction, gone into a space between two gardens and come to rest twenty yards away in the garden, with its nose protruding and fuze visable. The fuze was damaged and could not be identified. The locking ring was removed by hammer and cold chisel and when the ring was removed the fuze head came with it, most unfortunate. Green used a Doctors Stethoscope and could hear the fuze ticking. He removed the working party to a safe distance and with a hammer, cold chisel and screwdriver levered out the rest of the fuze. This was a 17 Long Delay. Next the gaine was removed, the fuze fired ten minutes afterwards. Green and Sapper Carter, (for his continous support), was awarded the GM

 

Henry Arthur Grover
143303 Capt Henry Arthur Grover. GM
32 Bomb Disposal Section.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30 September 1941.Awarded for an incident at Braemar Road, Brentford, Middlesex on the 3 October 1940.By September 1940, there was over three thousand uxb’s awaiting immunisation and removal. Due to the location of some civilians had to be evacuated from their homes. This put a strain on the housing departments. Many BD officers were conscious of this and when faced with a No 17 fuse, disregarded the operational order to dispose of them in situ. Instead they loaded them onto trucks and transported them to a safe area. Lt Grover was one such officer and on the 3 October 1940 removed on from Brentford to a safe area at Syon Park and was awarded the GM
Thomas Hall
1894353 Sgt Thomas Hall. GM
22 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17 August 1943.Awarded for an incidents at Mountnessing, Essex between the 4/9 March 1943.On the night of the 3/4 March 1943,  364 Butterfly bombs, S.D.2’s were dropped on Essex. Sgt Hall disposed of 32 of these at Mountnessing on the 5th then thirty two  more on the 6th and nineteen on the 7th, for this he was awarded the George Medal.
Evlyn Jolliffe Halstead-Hanby
Lt Evlyn Jolliffe  Halstead-Hanby. GM
8 Bomb Disposal Section
4 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1941.Awarded  for an incident at Theatre Street, Norwich, Norfolk on the 23 September 1940.After a raid on the night of 18/19 September, two large unexploded  bombs were left in the city. These were in Theatre Street and Mousehold. On investigating the latter it exploded at 11.30 in the morning, all that was left was a thirty foot crater. Halstead – Hanby was uninjured. He then went to Theatre Street fully aware that this could also explode. He and his men commenced work on the 23rd at Theatre Street. The bomb was located at a depth of twenty feet. It was fitted with a new design clockwork fuze. He was able to remove the fuze enabling the centre of Norwich to return to normality, or as normal as wartime could be. Halstead – Halby was awarded the George Medal.
Stephen David Hambrook
23056357 WO11 Stephen David Hambrook. GM 49 Bomb Disposal Squadron.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 21st April 1970.Awarded for an incident at Petworth, Sussex between the 9/10 August 1969.In 1941 a stick of bombs fell on marshy ground at Rotherbridge Farm, Petworth. three exploded the forth did not. Attempts to recover it failed due to excessive water and other UXB’s being of higher priority. In 1969 due to land being reclaimed, 2 Troop, 49 BD Squadron was tasked to relocate it, under the command of Capt C.E. Nicholls. It was relocated and a shaft started on the 4th August 1969, the bomb was located at a depth of six metres, five days later. The bomb was a 250kg, fuzed with a No 17. A electric stethoscope was fitted and the fuze was found not to be ticking. The area was evacuated and Nicholls with the assistance of WO 11 Hambrook immunised the fuze and removed the base plate. the explosive powder had deteriorated. This resulted in nine litres of nitroglycerine having been formed. Due to the unstability of the explosives it could only be removed by hand. This operation took twenty nine hours, eleven of these under extreme danger.
Arthur Bamford Hartley
276453 Maj Arthur Bamford Hartley GM, MBE.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 25th March 1960.Awarded for an incident in a sewer at Lower Richmond Road, Putney, London on the 1/2 July 1959.Workmen doing excavation work, alongside a sewer discovered a large bomb and reported it to the police. Maj Hartley and Capt Dace RE, BD stationed at Horsham were sent to the incident. It was identified as a 250kg fitted with two No 17 fuzes. The area was cleared and immunising work commenced. The conditions were unsavoury as well as hazardous. Whilst the work continued the excavation collapsed and raw sewage flowed into the hole, Hartley and Dace continued to work with sewage up to their knees. By 05.00 on the 2nd the fuzes had been removed and the filling steamed out.

 

P.M. Hennings
Lt P.M. Hennings. GM
12 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for an incident on the East Coast.Whilst engaged in minefield clearance operations early in 1944, Hennings was ordered to clear minefield on the South Coast, prior to D Day. All mines needed to be accounted for as no risk was to be left for the invasion forces due to use these beaches. There was no accurate minefield maps and some mines had moved due to tidal action. Hennings and his men cleared 2,500 mines with no loss life. For this and other incidents Hennings was awarded the George Medal.

 

William Mark Hewitt
73550 Capt William Mark Hewitt. GM
56 Bomb Disposal Section
11 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 25 March 1941.Awarded for a incident in the River Tyne, East Linton, Est Lothian on the 30 October to the 1st November 1940.A bomb landed in the River Tyne close to a bridge at East Linton. Capt Hewitt dived several times into the flooded river to locate the bomb. He could not see due to the mud the fuze type, but attempted to immunise it, these attempts were unsuccessfull. Finally he attached a rope to it and aided by Cpl Ramsey and Sapper Smith they were able to tie it round the bomb. The whole section assisted in pulling the bomb from the river. The fuze was identified and immunised, then the bomb sterilised. Thanks to Hewitt and his men a important bridge was saved from destruction.

 

John Henry Hinton
2021663 L/Sgt John Henry Hinton. GM
9 Bomb Disposal Company.68 Bomb Disposal Section.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 January 1941.Awarded for work at the Triumph Engineering Works, Coventry between the 15th and 17th October 1940.Whilst assisting Lt Campbell. L/Sgt Hinton was engaged in removing a 250kg bomb from the engineering works in Coventry. Due to this bomb work had ceased in the factory and some homes were evacuated. They worked for 48 hours without rest to remove this bomb. It was fitted with a delayed fuze, which could not be remove. The bomb was loaded onto a lorry and driven of to a safe distance.

 

Leonard Charles Clarence Hollands
1892128
Sgt Leonard Charles Clarence Hollands. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for various tasks in Grimsby and Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, between the 14 to 22 June 1943.16 June 43, dealt with a SD2, (Butterfly Bomb) in the circle of the Savoy Cinema, Victoria Street, Grimsby. Due to poor communication this had been completely covered by a sand bag, by a ARP warden. This Hollands removed by remote control. The friction in the tackle proved to much and he had to enter a false roof to get nearer and pull them free. The device exploded, luckily Hollands was protected by the sandbags. Another was found in a gutter at the Carr Lane School, this he reached by climbing along a sloping roof, with the risk of displacing slates onto the device. The 17th saw him dealing with 4 devices at the Tramway Depot Wharf, Victoria Street. The wharf was in a decaying state. To ensure nearby buildings were protected a sand bag wall was built. This proved dangerous in its self due to the poor condition of the wharf. When done the devices were destroyed by controlled explosions. The only damage two broken windows.

 

William Hone
1880443 Corporal William Hone. GM
9 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for: Smiths Stamping Works 8th Oct 40, Morris Mechanisms Ltd 10 April 41, Daimler Factory 11 April 41, all in Coventry.Cpl Horne was assiting his section officer, in the Morris Factory, dealing with a 250kg bomb. This was found under a capstan lathe. It was armed with a 17 and 50 fuze. This came as a great relief as they were using a pneumatic drill to dig down to it. It was uncovered and immunised in eight hours.  Next the Daimler factory, a 1000kg bomb was discovered, it was located 20 feet down in waterlogged ground. The fuze was unidenifiable so a decision to steam it out was agreed upon. The base plate was jammed so it was cut of with a hacksaw, this took 5 hours working in bad conditions.

 

M.J.V Hoskins
Major M.J.V Hoskins. GM.

Awarded for clearance work in Penang 1967 to 69.Thousand of tons were disposed of by demolition or sea dumping. All was in a dangerous condition after 21 years of corrosion and deterioration in a climate of 90% humidity. At the same time twelve man clearance  teams under Hoskins were in Brunei and other places in Malaysia.Maj M.J.V Hoskins was awarded the George Medal also honoured were S/Sgt J.C.V. Wood and  G. Duncan, Order of the British Empire MBE.

 

R.H. Hough
Major R.H. Hough GM, MBE. 

Awarded in 1953 for minefield work.Maj Hough and WO E.E. Thompson crawled into a live minefield at Mundesley on Sea, to recover Corporal Braddock who was injured. On reaching him it was found he was already dead.

 

John Pilkington Hudson
54288 Major John Pilkington Hudson. GM.
George Medal and Bar, MBE
HQ, Director of Bomb Disposal. 

Posted in London Gazette on the 20th April 1943.Awarded for an incident at Flour Mill, Albert Bridge, Battersea, Londonon the 24 June 1943.Major Hudson was a Boffin and needed fuzes for his research. He had developed a process for temporarily freezing a fuze, so enabling its removal whilst inert . He used this system on the Albert Bridge bomb. It took two hours the fuze pocket cracked, however no explosion occurred. It took twenty three minutes to remove the fuze, three over the safe time for freezing. Bar to GM Posted in the London Gazette on the 13th September 1944.Awarded for an incident at Strawberry Hill Farm, Staplecross, Sussex between 24th June and the 2nd July 1944.Hudson assisted by Mr Hurst and Doctor Dawson went to investigate a flying bomb that had landed at the farm without going off.  Tey wanted to examine the fuzing system, this being the first one to be found intact. Two fuzes found were the same as previous finds. The third in a rear side pocket was unmarked and unknown, it was to be recovered at all costs. Radiography equipment was used and showed a 17 clockwork fuze. Te operation was complex and went on for 9 days before it was removed, it was found to have only 32 minutes left to run when it had stopped.

 

John Sidney Jelley
1883537 Sgt John Sidney Jelley. GM.
8 Bomb Disposal Section.
4 Bomb Disposal Company. 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 January 1940.Awarded for action at Theatre Street, Norwich, Norfolk on the 23rd September 1940.At 01.00 on the morning of the 19 September, a large bomb fell in Theatre Street. This area was highly populated and had to be evacuated. Another bomb of similiar type dropped with this one had exploded at 12.45 that day. Due to ots location it was not deemed to be of a high priority so was left for a safety period of four days. Work commenced on the 23rd September and the bomb was found to be of a 880lb type, located twenty two feet underground. The fuze was clockwork and new a type. With the knowledge that this bomb could explode at any time Jelley with total disregard for his personal safety carried on working until the bomb was loaded onto a lorry and taken away. He insisted that he went with it to a safe location.

 

Gordon Martin Jensen
179170 Lt Gordon Martin Jensen. GM.
3 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for action at various sites in Grimsby, Cleethorpes, Linconshire, between the 15th to 22nd June 1943.At Ogle’s Timber Yard, on the 15th June, Lt Jensen found a SD2 (Butterfly bomb), resting near to a piece of Belguim Machinery, which was very valuable. Sandbags could not be placed as the floor was found to be loose and movement of the device was possible. This device was fitted with a anti handling fuze. Therefore he attached a cord to it, on the assumption that if pulled hard enough, the device would travel far enough way from the machinery before exploding, so preventing damage, in this assumption he was proved correct. The next day he dealt with another SD2 under a projector in the Palace Cinema. He constructed a tunnel of sandbags to pull the device through, with cord, away from the projector.  He managed to pull the device out of the room before it exploded causing minimual damage, five broken windows.On the 20th June he was found on hands and knees, attempting to extract a SD2 fron a seven junction drain. If this had exploded it would have caused problems for drainage for many houses. A tower of strawbales was placed around the manhole and a magnet suspended in the middle. This was carefully lowered onto the bomb and raised out of the drain and once clear another bale was put over the drain to prevent damage if the device went of. This action was completed safely.

 

W. Jones
Cpl W. Jones. GM. 
5 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for action at Orbois France, Sept 1944.Cpl Jones was engaged on clearance of mines and booby traps in the village of Orois. Where four accidents had occurred. Between the 3 to 7 September he cleared eleven booby traps two being very sensitive. On the 8th when his section Officer, Platoon Sgt and L/Sgt became casualties of a Schu mine, Cpl Jones continued clearance operations, although the Section Officer expressed doubts as to the viability of the equipment in use. The 12th September saw a L/Cpl and a Sapper killed in the same minefield. Work continued with Cpl Jones in charge. Clearance was hindered by equipment strewn across the area and fallen trees. Cpl Jones was honoured for his leadership and high devotion to duty.

 

W. Jones
Cpl W. Jones. GM. 
5 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for action at Orbois France, Sept 1944.Cpl Jones was engaged on clearance of mines and booby traps in the village of Orois. Where four accidents had occurred. Between the 3 to 7 September he cleared eleven booby traps two being very sensitive. On the 8th when his section Officer, Platoon Sgt and L/Sgt became casualties of a Schu mine, Cpl Jones continued clearance operations, although the Section Officer expressed doubts as to the viability of the equipment in use. The 12th September saw a L/Cpl and a Sapper killed in the same minefield. Work continued with Cpl Jones in charge. Clearance was hindered by equipment strewn across the area and fallen trees. Cpl Jones was honoured for his leadership and high devotion to duty.

 

William Arthur Jones
1924892 Sgt William Arthur Jones. GM. 
97 Bomb Disposal Section.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.For action on the 18th August 1940.A 250kg bomb fell on a factory and Sgt Jones assisting Lt Manser at great risk to themselves, uncovered and removed the fuze, rendering the bomb safe. This fuze was of a long delay type. For their cool courage, with a high expectancy of sudden death both were awarded the George Medal.

 

Edward Laing
2217011 Sgt Edward Laing GM
9 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for actions at Ryvita Factory, Bordesley Green Road, Birmingham in September 40. GEC Works, Electric Avenue, Witton, North Birmingham on 21st November 40. BSA Guns Factory, Armoury Road, Small Heath, Birmingham on the 29th November 1940.A 250 kg bomb fell in the Ryvita Factory, this penetrated to a depth of thirty two feet. Whilst digging a strata of Calcium Carbine was found at seventeen feet, one man was overcome by the fumes and Sgt Laing at great personal risk rescued him. He then continued to remove the remaing Carbine so work could procceed. On reaching the bomb Laing had to lie full length alongside it using a trowel to uncover the fuze.For this and above mentioned incidents he was awarded the George Medal.

 

Kenneth Lanham
166473 Lt Kenneth Lanham. GM
17 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 5th May 1944.Awarded for action at Taranto, Italy between the 18th September and 16th October 1944.At Taranto Lt Lanham dealt with six British UXB’s, these were all fitted with long delay and anti handling fuzes. They could not be in situ, as the resulting damage would have interfered with Naval and Military Operations. One bomb was by the main viaduct, another in a gasworks and four on the main rail line.

 

Bertie McIntyre Lawson
Cpl Bertie McIntyre Lawson. GM.  4 Bomb Disposal Company. 8 Bomb Disposal Section. Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 January 1941.Awarded for action at Theatre Street, Norwich, Norfolk.No further details at this time.Possibly linked to the action of Lt Halstead-Hanby GM.
Charles William Lea
65769 Capt Charles William Lea. GM

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for actions at Loving Hall, North Cray, Kent on the 28th October 1949 and Johnson Road, Bromley, Kent on the 9th November 1940.On the 9th November 1940, a German plane crashed on houses, trapping residents. Due to a delayed action bomb, rescue work was hampered. This task would normally be given to the RAF as it is their remit to remove bombs on or near aitcraft. However, Capt Lea was tasked. He arrived at 22.45 hours. Thirty bombs were found in and around the aircraft. To add to the risk the aircrafts fuel was spread around the area. With skill and courage Lea recovered and made safe all bombs. Allowing rescue work to continue. For this and work on a parachute mine in Sept Capt Lea was honoured with the George Medal.

 

Ralph Henry Lee
135081 2nd Lt Ralph Henry Lee. GM, BSc, AMInstCE 
9 Bomb Disposal Company.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1941.Awarded for a action at Burman Ltd, Leebank Works, Highland Road, Birmingham on the 28th October 1940.Lt Lee was called to a aircraft factory, where he found a bomb had come to rest under vital machinery. It tok fourty five hours digging to get to it andit was found to be a 250kg fitted with a 17 fuze, which was ticking. He sent his men to a safe area and attempted to remove the fuze after fifteen minutes with no success, he got a crowbar and levered the electric part of the fuze out, however the clock was still ticking. He then filled the fuze pocket with water and continued to fill the rest of the shaft with water to stop the clock. This worked and the bomb was removed the next morning.  Lee worked on the bomb for thirty five minutes, at any time it could have exploded.

 

Reginald James Broadbridge Maitland
140277 Lt Reginald James Broadbridge Maitland. GM. 
23 Bomb Disposal Company 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 24th March 1942.For action at: Vickers-Supermarine Works, Mortimer Road, 28th September 40, Woolston Hampshire, Electricity Works, Southhampton, 1st October 40. Hunters Hill, Southhamptom, 28th September 40. Police Station, Woolston, Hampshire, 13th October 40. Cobden Avenue, Southhampton, 24th November 40.Vickers was hit by a 250kg bomb , Maitland and his men started working on it within four hours. It was at a depth of four feet, through concrete. The fuzes were unidentifiable and pockets so distorted fuze removal was impossible, even though a hammer and cold chisel was used. So the filling plate was removed and the filling was found to be cast TNT. With no other option the bomb was removed to a safe area for demolition, Maitland drove the vehicle himself. The next day found him at a Gas Works, with another Category A bomb. Due to its location the whole plant was shut down, causing serious disruption to supplies, needed for war production. On arrival two 250kg bombs were found with No 17 fuzes. From arrival it took three hours to deal with these and the task was completed by 20:00.The next day was a Electricity Power Station. Work commenced at 14:00 hours  on a 250kg bomb with a fuze that was unidentifiable, a hammer and cold chisel was used to remove it. Maitland and his men were lucky on another bomb as fifteen minutes after they knocked of for dinner it exploded, destroying the road. In November whilst digging down to fifteen feet, he stopped work and the bomb exploded when he was ten yards away.

 

Harold Arthur Manser
2/nd Lt Harold Arthur Manser. GM. 
93 Bomb Disposal Section

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.Awarded for actions on the 18th August and the 2nd September 1940.The 18th August incident found Lt Manser and Sgt Jones, dealing with a ticking long delay 250kg bomb. They uncovered and removed the fuzes, regardless of the danger to themselves.2/Lt Frances Robert Martin.5 Bomb Disposal Section.Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.Awarded for an action at Chevening House, Chevening, Kent on the 17/17th September 1940.A unexploded bomb at Lord Stanhopes residence was reported and Lt Martin tasked. Lady Stanhope could not be evacuated due to a serious ilness. Martin had recently lost four men on a similiar bomb so decided to do the job himself. He reached the bomb at 04:00 the next day extracted the still ticking fuze making the bomb safe and saving her ladyships life.

 

John Richard Filgate McCartney
Capt John Richard Filgate McCartney. GM. 
3 Bomb Disposal Company 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1941.Awarded for action at Boffey’s Farm, Hartshorne, Derbyshire  on the 4-11 September 1940.Ten bombs were dropped on Hartshorne. Two failed to explode these were high explosive. Capt McCartney and seventeen men commenced work on one at Boffey’s Farm. The UXB had penentrated to a depth of twenty six feet, close to building foundations. The digging cut through varying strata’s soil, sub soil, shaly clay, coal and pottery clay and tok a week to complete and render safe. The second bomb was near to the Bulls Head, at twenty eight feet. Digging was a problem due to water. This meant the shaft walls were in danger of collapse through out the operation. For this operation and others McCartney received the George Medal.

 

Lionel Charles Meynell
93424 Lt Lionel Charles Meynell. GM. 
9 Bomb Disposal Company 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.Awarded for action at Smiths Stamping Works, Coventry, 8th October 40, RAF Station, Church Lawford, Warwickshire, 16th October 40 and Binney Sand Pitts, Coventry, 6th November 1940.Smiths Stamping Works was doing vital war work, when hit by a bomb. When Lt Meynell uncovered the bomb it was found that the fuze was so damaged it could not be removed. So Meynell picked it up and carried it to a truck, then drove it to waste ground, where it exploded fourty five minutes later.A week later at a RAF Station, a reporterd oil incendiary bomb was found to be a 250kg High Explosive bomb. This was fitted with a long delay fuze, which was ticking. Meynell immediately removed the fuze, although there could have been booby traps underneath.

 

Harry Mitchell
Capt Harry Mitchell. GM
95/96 Bomb Disposal Sections

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.Awarded for action on the 13th August 1940.Capt Mitchell was given a list of UXB’s t o deal with. He firstly dealt with a 250kg. This he discovered was fuzed by a long delay, with clockwork mechanism which was of a new type. Regardless of no information being available, Mitchell decided to disarm the bomb and send the fuze for research. This he did successfully and was awarded the George Medal. There are however no records of those who died whilst attempting this same dangerous operation.

 

H. Morgan
Lt L.H. Morgan. GM. 7 Bomb Disposal Company. 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 5th October 1945.Awarded for action at Wyke Regis on the 8th December 1944.Lt Taffy Morgan, was engaged on minefield clearance operations since December 44. When on the 8th December 44, whilst working on a difficult field at Wyke Regis, an explosion occurred killing an NCO. Morgan was badly injured himself, but tended to the needs of those injured more seriously. Entering the live part of the minefield, he removed the injured and the badly mutilated body of the dead NCO. Later he continued to clear this field.

 

Clive Neville Newitt
139087 Lt Clive Neville Newitt. GM 5 Bomb Disposal Company Posted in the London Gazzette on the 24th May 1942.Awarded for actions at: Regent Street, West London, September 40. Pall Mall, St James’s,  London, October 40. National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London, 23rd October 40. Chesterton Road, Ladbrook Grove, London, 2nd December 40. Shaftesbury Avenue, West End, London, 16th to 18th December 40.Lt Newitt was a luck man, four times between September and October 1940, did he have lucky escapes. His first bomb a Category A, was being worked on, just after they knocked of for their evening meal, after working all day, it exploded. The second at Regent Street, was having its TNT fill removed, by the steaming out process, when it exploded, due to safety precautions set up nobody was hurt. Third time lucky in October, a 250kg at the National Gallery. A new immunisation method was available so the bomb was removed to try it out. On arriving at the test location they went for a meal, it exploded a few minutes after they left. Lastly Pall Mall, the bomb was removed to a demolition site, where it exploded a few minutes later.LUCKY CLIVE.His story does not end here, for on the 16th November 40, he was tasked to a 1000kg bomb at Shaftesbury Avenue, dropped the night before. This had penetrated the ground andpassed through a cable duct, without damaging the cable. It was a Caregory A, and work started at once, two days later at eighteen feet it was discovered. Fitted with a fuze cap no identification was possible. Hewitt removed the cap and identified the fuze. The bomb was steamed out before removal. Shortly after at 106 Chesterton Road, on a Category A, 250kg bomb, which was fitted with both a type 17 and 50 fuze. Newittcould not remove the fuzes, or filler cap,  due to damage. It was also impossible to fit the Trepanner and cut the fuze pockets out remotely. So he cut a hole by hand, this was dangerous as even a slight jar could start the clock ticking. However, the hole was cut and the bomb steamed out.
Alfred Parker
Sgt Alfred Parker. GM.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 25th June 1946.Awarded for action at Belmont Road, Belfast in October 1945.Sgt Parker was assisting Lt J. Deacon on a 250kg bomb discovered near to the Automatic Telephone Exchange, this exchange handled calls for the Northern Ireland Parliment building at Stormont and two other goverment buildings. The bomb had both a type 17 and 50 fuze. The 50 was immunised but the bomb had to be moved fro site with a clock stopper attached over the type 15 fuze. A risk was also present if an attempt was made to remove the No 17 fuze. During transporting the bomb the clockstopper was damaged and rendered inoperable, so the rest of the journey was made at even greater risk. However it arrived at a safe area and was blown up with no damage.Due to the speed of the operation, evacuated people returnedhome before nightfall. Both Lt Deacon and Sgt Parker were awarded the George Medal for this action.

 

R.C. Parker
L/Sgt R.C. Parker. GM.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 27th May 1941.Awarded for actions on Malta.No details available at this time.

Major W.G. Parker. GM, MBE
16 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 5th October 1945.Awarded for actions at Corsham.Major  Paddy Parker was in charge of the clear up operations in Grimsby of SD2’s (Butterfly Bombs) in June 1943.  Also in charge of 6 Bomb Disposal Company, which cleared SD2’s in May 1944 in the Bovington Area. In 1944 Parker was involved in clearing minefields and showed great ingenuity and initiative, when much needed as the company were experiencing heavy losses. They were working by a ammunition magazine at Corsham, Wiltshire at the time. The clearance was of only sixteen mines, however they were placed in a one hundred and fifty foot dark tunnel. Thet were of the Anti Tank Mark 1 type and all had been fitted to a No 5 Trap Mechanism. These were deemed to be so dangerous that Parker elected to disarm them himself. The preesure required to detonate these mines was not known, as they had lain there since 1940. With the aid of some dim artificial light all were rendered safe.

 

Nick Pettit
WO I Nick Pettit.  GM, QGM
33 Engineer Regiment (EOD)
Citation.March 2003

WO1 Pettit has been employed as the Regimental Sergeant Major (RSM) of the Joint EOD Group on Operation Telic in Iraq. The Group is responsible for providing EOD support to 1 (UK) Armoured Division in order to enhance freedom of manoeuvre and force protection. He has frequently operated in hazardous environments in the combat zone, where his strong leadership and command skills came to the fore. In addition, he was responsible for extracting four RAF personnel from a minefield at night and in contact. At approximately 2300hrs on 21 March 2003, RSM Pettit reported to the Command Vehicle 5131 (BD) Squadron and was briefed about a mine strike on a road near Safwan Hill, which was the initial objective for the Joint Helicopter Force’s (JHF) advance into Iraq. It was not clear whether there were any casualties or whether the airmen had managed to extract themselves from the minefield. Whilst deploying to the mine strike, he came under fire, but the enemy were successfully driven off. On arrival at the mine strike, he was informed that there were actually four personnel still in a Land Rover in the minefield, one of whom was seriously injured, whilst the others were suffering from shock. In addition, the road had been blocked, causing a major traffic jam that was significantly slowing down the deployment. The vehicle itself was blown over at a 45 degree angle to the ground and was severely damaged. He set up an Incident Control Point (ICP) in order to ensure that no other personnel deployed accidentally into the minefield and from where the operation could be controlled. As it was dark, he set up 2 Land Rovers at an angle with their headlights pointing at the damaged vehicle and he ensured that all soldiers took up protective positions behind their vehicles.  Once all the safety precautions had been taken he proceeded to clear a lane into the minefield using the “look, feel, prod” method, with a Maglite torch and constantly updated the other soldiers on his progress, at all times encouraging them to stay calm and not move or panic. At night, mine clearance is an extremely hazardous and stressful task. He marked his route with mine marking tape and whenever he came across any anti tank mines or time delayed action fuses, he marked them for subsequent disposal. On reaching the vehicle he helped the driver out and led him to safety along the cleared route. He had then to re-enter the minefield and deal with the casualty, who by this time was slipping in and out of consciousness. He placed the injured airman on his shoulders and carried him out to a waiting nurse who then dealt with his injuries. The remaining two airmen were still in shock and refused to walk out unaided, so he had to re-enter the minefield a further two times and lead them successfully to safety. They were taken to the Regimental Aid Post for treatment and the road was successfully reopened for traffic. The next day it was confirmed that he had cleared a total of 26 VS 1.6 Italian mines and time pencils in the minefield that were subsequently destroyed.  WO1 Pettit’s actions were witnessed by Wing Commander Driver from JHF who confirmed that the risk to his life has been significant and that his bravery and calming influence under real stress was of the highest order. At no stage could WO 1 Pettit have been sure that his actions would not lead to the detonation of the mines and his own death. Despite this, he continued to work with relentless determination, speed and resolve under the most arduous of conditions that was an example to all. He showed sustained courage and coolness of the very highest order and is most strongly recommended for formal recognition of his actions.For this he received the George Medal.

One of Nick’s fondest memories, is a letter from one of the soldiers he saved parents. The bottom line reads ” Thank you very much for bring our son home alive. You will always be a big part of our family.”

 

Brompton Hucker Philip Price
152404 Lt Brompton Hucker Philip Price. GM. 
7 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th October 1941.Awarded for actions at: National Smelting Works, Avonmouth, Gloucestershire, 15th January 41, Plymouth and Devonport, Devon, 22 to 30th April 41.Lt Price had joined No 7 BD Company in October 1940. In January 41 he was tasked to the Smelting works for a 250 or 500kg bomb. This was in a silo. The bomb was underneath 100 feet of phosphate. When reached it was found to be the larger 1000kg bomb armed with a 28 fuze. Part of the silos structure had to be dismantled to remove the device. This was completed and the Smelting works in operation in twelve hours,The 21st to 23rd, 28/9th of April saw heavy bombing in the Plymouth/Devonport area. Price reconnoitered thirteen Category A bombs, 147 Cat B bombs and 69 Cast c and D devices. On the 22/23rh he went to a Cat A bomb, driving himself, when he arrived he found a 250kg bomb on the surface, with a type 15 fuze. He defused it then and there, saving time and avoiding evacuating the Guildhall, which would have seriously affected the organisation of the Civil Defence.

 

H.P. Qualtrough
Maj H.P. Qualtrough. GM. BEM
Bomb Disposal Unit (UK)
Gilbert and Ellice Islands.October 1965 and March 1966

Major Qualtrough and Sgt J. Cooke BEM, were tasked with a most hazardous overseas task. Intially on there way to Betio Island, they were to carry out a reconnaisance on Penang, of abandoned Japanese mine and bomb dumps. Part of Penang had been cleared in the 1950’s, however nine storage tunnels and hiden pits were discovered and contained a vast collection of mines and shells, many oozing explosives. Work went on in Penang till November 1965, when both men set of for Betio.The majority of explosives on Betio was found to be in fifty collapsed bunkers. Qualtrough and Cooke’s official task was to, clear the bunkers by hand and sea dump the contents, re-inter any body parts found and finally give the island a clearance sweep using mine detectors, a doubting task. A preliminary reconnaissance was undertaken on the 30th November 1965, fourty two bunkers were located, some gun sites, others command posts and bomb stores. The collapsed bunkers contained shells for 203, 152, 157 and 76.2 mm calibre, also present were mines bombs and other ammunition. Work commenced on the 3rd December, locals were employed for the task alongside fifteen prisoners provided by the Chief Police Officer. By 19th January 1966 al bar one bunker was clear. The ammunition removed was in poor condition, some so badly deteriorated that it gave of toxic fumes. The local work force however were uninterested in safety often removing the explosive at night for private use. The final bunker was the most difficult, as it had suffered several direct hits through the war. Ecavation began on 29th December 1965 but on 3rd February work ceased as the risks were to great, 20.3 tons had by now been removed. Sea dumping continued till 3 March 1966. In total over 100 tons of explosives were cleared from Betio, however much more remained. Both Major Qualtrough and Sgt Cooke were later awarded the George Medal.

 

Gordon Harold Quarendon
1895955 Sgt Gordon Harold Quarendon. GM
14 Bomb Disposal Company

Placed in the London Gazette on the 24th March 1942.Awarded for incidents at: Quibley’s Yard, Hull on the 27th March 1941, Holderness Road, Hull on the 9th May 1941 and Priestinog’s Factory, Hull, Yorkshire on the 18th July 1941.Quibley’s Yard saw Lt Babes Ruth dealing with a Category A bombThis was a 250kg with two No 17 fuses, both ticking. With Sgt Quarendon this was removed to a bomb cemetery were it later exploded.In May Quarendon was in charge of a section digging for a 250 kg bomb in a house. This was located four feet down, with a 17 and 50 fuze, the 17 was ticking. With no officer present Quarendon immunised the 50, fitted a clock stopper on the 17  and removed it by lorry to the bomb cemetary. Due to his quick action damage to a bakery was avoided. A day later he was in action again, tunneling in debris to get to five trapped people, whilst a heavy air raid continued above. He was awarded the George Medal, for his fine example of bravery.

 

Eric Russell Raby
Lt Eric Russell Raby.GM
75/6 Bomb Disposal Sections

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.Awarded for an action in Manchester.Lt Raby who was commanding the 75/6 BD Sections, was injured whilst dealing with a 250kg bomb fuzed with a No 17, this was ticking. Raby was able to remove the fuze, however before he could remove the gaine it exploded, causing severe injuries.135034 Lt Fredrick Radford.4 Bomb Disposal Company.Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd July 1941.Awarded for action in East Anglia between May 1940 and March 1941.No further details at this time.

 

Daniel Hunter Ramage
135035 Lt Daniel Hunter Ramage. GM
81/82 Bomb Disposal Sections

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11 March 1941.Awarded for a action at Messrs Pilkington Bros Works, St Helens, Lancashire on the 4th September 1940.Called to the Pilkington Works Lt Ramage discovered a bomb had penentrated a concrete floor to a depth of twelve feet. On reaching the bomb it was found to be so badly damaged that the fuze could not be removed. The location of this bomb meant that vital war production was being held up. So a novel approach was adopted, he unscrewed the filler cap and removed the TNT fill till he could reach the fuze pocket and withdraw it. For conspicous courage, coolness and ability to adapt to various situations, Ramage was awarded the George Medal.

 

Douglas Stanley Fredrick Rayner
135046 Lt Douglas Stanley Fredrick Rayner. GM. 
9 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1941.Awarded for actions at: Aircraft Factory, Castle Bromwich, Staffordshire on the 3rd September 1940 and at a Factory, Yardley, Birmingham on the 6th September 1940. The aircraft factory had been closed down, due to six unexploded bombs being found on its premises. Lt Rayner set his men to work and within half a day all six had been uncovered and defused.Two days later at another factory he removed a 250kg bomb. This had a ticking 17 fuze, it was badly damaged around the fuze pocket, by its journey through concrete. Rayner had to use a Marlinespike to remove the fuze. This took him thirty five minutes, the fuze could have detonated at any time.

 

James Baird Renfrew
2127158 L/Sgt James Baird Renfrew. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for actions at Grimsby and Cleethorpes, Linconshire between 14th and 22nd June 1943.On the 16th June L/Sgt Renfrew went to the small yard at the rear of the Salvation Army Hall, to investigate an S.D.2 (Butterfly Bomb). He found a pile of sandbags, the ARP wardens had misunderstood instructions and covered it with sandbags. He removed the top layer and cut through the lower ones, so as not to disturb the device, till he could view it. A charge was placed upon it and detonated, the only damage, a small window broken.On the 19th he defuzed a bomb, which he thought had failed to arm itself as he was working he heard it arm,. He was fortunate that he was able to remove the fuze and throw it away. Luckly the gaine made of bakelite was broken and stayed in the bomb, minimising the explosion. However he did suffer a few pieces of copper embedded in his hand.The 21st saw him dealing with a bomb insecurely balanced on a bed at 27 Campden Road, however he managed to move the furniture and destroyed the SD2 by a controlled explosion.

 

Brian Leolin Richards
Lt Brian Leolin Richards. GM
25 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 8th July 1941.Awarded for actions at: Yorkshire Grey Dance Hall, Westhorne Road, Eltham Green, London between 28th April and 3rd May 1941.Lt Ricky Richards, had a dodgy bomb to deal with. During the digging operations, he had to withdraw the men from the shaft, the problem water and gravelly ground. The soft ground was covering the bomb, Richards continued the digging himself. The fuze a 17, started ticking, then stopped, this happened intermittently. Due to the bombs location a road junction had been closed for nine days, therefore it was decided to destroy the bomb in situ, if it stopped ticking for any length of time. This happened and Richards made up the charge, the bomb was by now under three feet of muddy, gravelly water, therefore the operation was dangerous and his actions gallant. The charge was placed and the bomb exploded, no serious damage was caused due to the tamping effect of the water. Richards had worked non stop for eighteen hours, never risking his mens lifes, but taking the isks himself.General Taylor commented, “I consider that this is an outstanding example of cold-blooded courage and determination for which the award of the George Cross would apear appropriate.”However the George Medal was awarded instead.

 

Kenneth Hugh Robinson
166532 Lt Kenneth Hugh Robinson. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th July 1944.Awarded for actions at: Norwich area on April 1943, Raveningham between the 24th to 26th September 1943, Swatlow Airfield 6th October 1943 and areas of the Norfolk coast during October and December 1943.After a rain in late September, on Norwich, Lt Robinson disposed of seventy nine S.D.2’s in a heavily wooded area around Raveningham. Locating them was difficult due to thick undergrowth, also it made identification hard, this was needed so a decision to attach a cord or place a charge could be made. Soon after another BD Officer was killed and another injured, by it is believed a new fuze the Y. Robinson was then put in charge of all BD Operations in the area. During this period he uncovered and immunised seven 500kg bombs, all fitted with sensitive fuzes. For these actions and minefield clearance operations he was awarded the George Medal.

 

Horace Cecil Ruth
152400 Lt Horace Cecil Ruth. GM
14 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 13th January 1942.Awarded for actions at: Yorkshire, Bridlington Railway Station on the 16th February 41, Quiblings Yard, Hull on the 27th March 41, Central Fire Station, Priestmans Factory, all in Hull and the Railway at Flambourgh on the 18th July 1941.Lt (Babes) Ruth, dealt with a Category A bomb at Bridlington Railway Station, arriving at 10.00 hrs, digging starting at 11.00hrs. On uncovering the bomb it was found to be a 250kg, the fuze was of the 17 type and a 50. The fuzes were immunised and bomb made safe. The station reopened by 18.00 hrs on the same day.Ruth on the 27th March, dealt with another Category A bomb at Quiblings Yard, again a 250 kg with two ticking 17 fuzes.  The bomb was uncovered and removed to the bomb cemetery, it exploded shortly afterwards. At the Central Fire Station, Hull, Ruth during a heavy air raid was called to investigate a bomb. He discovered this was one of a stick of four, one had exploded previously. The fire appliances inside were needed, so Ruth stood by the entry hole and directed the vehicles to safety. Ruth then left to investigate anothe bomb at Priestmans, and the bomb at the fire station exploded shortly after he left. The bomb at Priestmans was a 500kg, Ruth and Sgt Quarendon dug down to it, it was four feet down and the fuzes could not be identified, as the tops had been torn off. So the bomb was immediately placed on a truch and driven off, the factory was back in operation by 09.30hrs the same day.

 

Andrew Sanders
L/Sgt Andrew Sanders. GM
9 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for actions at: Nechells Gas Works, on the 20th November 1940 and Delbran Road, Sparkbrook on the 2nd February 1940 both in Birmingham.On the night of 19th November a 250kg bomb fell close to the condensers at the gas works. The BD Company were informed at 06.30 the next day. L/Sgt Sander in charge of a section was sent to deal with it. He had been injured twice before and dealt with five Category A bombs. The bomb was reached and immunised by 12.30 that day.71764 Capt Thomas Henry Sharman.9 Bomb Disposal Company.Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for actions at: Gec Works, Electric Street, 19th October 40, BSA (Tools), Small Heath, 13 to 14th December 40, Wolseley Motors Factory, Coventry Road, 10th April 40 all in Birmingham.Capt Sharman at 03.00 hrs took his section to the GEC Works at Witton. A heavy air raid was in progress. The bomb had fallen at half twelve that night, after some fast digging the bomb was uncovered a no 17 fuze removed all by 09.30 hrs in the morning.At 01.30hrs on the 12th December Sharman, recieved a call, a UXB had been found at the BSA Works, on arrival they searched for the bomb this took some time and work didnt start till 03.00hrs this continued till the 14th at 14.00hrs when they reached the bomb.  The fuze a no 17 was identified and removed, all the time they were working on the bomb a air raid was in progress and other bombs fell near by.The 10th April saw Sharman at the Wolseley Works. A 250 kg bomb with a no 17 and 50 fuzes was discovered. As a Category A  bomb speed was of a essence, this type of fuzes bomb could explode up to eighty hours after it had been dropped. It was also holding up vital war work it was removed within fourteen hours.

 

Robert Sharp
16227 Lt Robert Sharp. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for action at: various sites in Grimsby and Cleethorpes, Linconshire between the 14th and 22nd June 1943.Lt Sharp was the first officer to arrive on a task, one of the first jobs was a bomb which was holding up the traffic on two railway lines as well as part of a Power Station. These were SD2’s (Butterfly Bombs), with anti handling devices. By 16.30 hrs Sharp had disposed of ten of these devices and services were back in operation. The next day he was wounded in the hand and leg, after dealing with eight devices. This was caused by a sympathetic detonation of a undiscovered device. Although injured he continued to work untill the next day when the Commanding Officer ordered him to report to the hospital.  Kept in hospital till the 19th, he resumed work on the same day, from then till the 20th he defused thirty two bombs and detonated fifteen more. On the 21st he disposed of one hundred and thirty more at Calethorpe Farm, Louth.

 

Clifford Percy Shelbourne
120604 Capt Clifford Percy Shelbourne GM, AMInstCE
4 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22nd July 1941.Awarded for work in East Anglia and Cheshire between June 1940 and March 1941.No further details at this time.4456425 Sgt Frank Cecil Simpson.3 Bomb Disposal Company.Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for work at various sites in Grimsby and Cleethorpes, Linconshire between 14th to 22nd June 1943.Sgt Simpson personally dealt with 43 SD2’s (Butterfly bombs) in one week in June 43, during this period most of the Company Officers and Sgts were in the Grimsby area. A typical ways he had in dealing with them was: in Hainton Methodist Church, one was on was inside the panelling of the organ. He removed somepanelling and placed a hook around the device, he was then able to remotely remove the bomb. It did explde during the operation but only minor damage was caused, the organ escaped undamaged. On the same day at 86 Fairmont Street, he found a device in the front room, he removed the furniture and fittings then removed the device. One other device was found on a rockery, rather precariously balanced, so he built a wall of straw bales round it and detonated it. Although the house was only five feet away no damage was caused.

 

Francis Sivil
4067723 CSM Francis Sivil. GM
14 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for work at Laing’s Shipyard, Sunderland, Co Durham Sheffield, Yorkshire on the 12/13th August 1940 and 13 to 16th December 1940.No further details.Lt. E.W. Sivil.Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for work in Sussex. Lt Sivil was called away from mine clearance work,  We had invaded France and the V1 attacks were at their height, only a few of these exploded. Sivil was dispatched to immunise  on in 20 Bomb Disposal Company’s area, (Kent and Sussex). This was his first, the only information he had was what he had read, in BD instructions. These instructions were sent round as updates to the Germans latest tricks. So with the instructions and his own expertise he dealt with it succesfully. For this and his minefield work he was awarded the George Medal.

 

F. Smith
CSM F. Smith. GM
14 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 21st October 1941. Awarded for work in Sunderland.Between the 13 and 16 December CSM Smith and his men rushed around checking out reported UXB’s. Each night another raid, and more work. He also during this period with his men uncovered and made safe six 250kg bombs, all fitted with No 17 long delay fuzes, one of these was partially buried next to a petrol storage tank. For this and work earlier in Sunderland he was awarded the George Medal.

 

James. B. Smith
Capt James. B. Smith. GM.

Awarded for work at Mersa Matruh between the 27th May and 12th September 1941. Capt James undertook the most hazardous in investigating, defuzing, removing and destruction of several hundred enemy UXB’s. These were of all shapes, sizes and weights, the largest being 1000kg. One was found twenty feet down, another at twenty eight. He dealt with two 250kg bombs on the 29th December, if these had gone of several buildings would have been demolished. He also later made safe two Italian mines. In all case Smith was the first on site.He was awarded the George medal for displaying gallantry and continued devotion to duty and bravery.

Charles Coulton Stewart
119053 Capt Charles Coulton Stewart. GM
9 Bomb Disposal Group

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for work at: Youngs Accumulater, Kingston, Surrey on the 15th August 1940 and Cricketer’s Public House, London Road, Mitcham, Surrey on the 22/23rd September 1940.

 

Ernest Wilfred Suttle
1883145 L/Cpl Ernest Wilfred Suttle. GM
9 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 30th September 1941.Awarded for work at: English Electric Test Laboratory, Stafford, 9th October 40, Aeroplane Assembly Shop, Humber Hilman Factory, Coventry, 19th November 40 and Olton Boulevarde, Acocks Green, Birmingham on the 16th December 40.After just a month in BD L/Cpl Suttle was working on a 250kg bomb at a Test Lab, it had fallen at 11.00 hrs, he and his party arrived at 15.330 hrs. When uncovered it was found to be fuzed by a 17 and 50 type fuzes and armed. The section officer immunised the 50 but could not remove the 17, so he and Suttle, gently moved the bomb to a safe area.Suutle was in charge of a working party, went with his Section Officer to the Humber Hilman Factory. Two 250kg bomb were reported, They were about seventy yards apart, during the morning one exploded killing two of the working party. Despite this Suttle continued to work on the other bomb, by 15.00hrs that day it had been identified, the fuze imunised and the bomb was safe for removal. In Birmingham, Suttle was working on a suspected UXB. A camouflet was discoverd and one man fell into the crater, he was overcome by the fumes. Sutton with no thought for his own safety, put a rope round himself and jumped into the crater., which was full of Carbon Monoxide. He tied another rope around the casualty and they were both pulled out. Both men suffered form carbon monoxide poisoning but recovered.

 

Charles Swinson
232126 Lt Warner Charles Swinson. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 15th September 1944.Awarded for actions at: Chelmsford, Essex, April/May 42, Colchester, Essex and Helmingham, Sussex, December 43, Harlow, Essex, December 43.Lt Swinson was taked with clearing SD2’s (Butterfly Bombs) in Chelmsford. He and his section quickly cleared the area, Swinsons personal total was fourty devices. He later cleared another fourty three on heathland.In December in Harlow, Swinson was in charge of dealing with four 500 kg bombs fitted with the new Y fuzes. Two were detonated in situ the other two had to be rendered safe. He personally dealt with the first and supervised the second operation. For theses actions and mine clearance work he recieved the George Medal.

 

Louis Norwell Taylor
102894 Lt Louis Norwell Taylor. GM
4 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 22 July 1941.Awarded for action at: Tilbury area, Essex between June 40 and March 41.Lt Taylor was awarded a Kings Commendation for work with SD2’s (Butterfly bombs) in Ipswich in October 1940 and the George Medal for work in Tilbury docks, no further details available at this time.1864311 Sgt Thomas Taylor.22 Bomb Disposal Company.Posted in the London Gazette on the 10th March 1942.Awarded for work at: Lowestoft, Suffolk betwwen the 15/16th April 1941.No further details at this time.

 

Alexander Charles Thomas
161582 Lt Alexander Charles Thomas. GM
3 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 19th November 1943.Awarded for work at various sites at: Grimsby and Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire between the 15 to 22 June 1943.Lt Tommy Thomas dealt with seventy three SD2’s (Butterfly bombs) armed, between the 15th to 22 nd June, and forty six in two containers. The second day saw him at the Co-Op in  Freeman Street, one device was on the floor of a room, with another hanging through the ceiling. He erected a scaffold and placed a demolition charge on it, he surrounded the one below with sandbags, both were detonated together and a third on a roof a short distance away went of in sympathy.He also found one at Forrester and Boyd Accountants, in a false roof. He could not remove it by pulling it along the roof as the chute got caught up. The fins caught and the cord broke, returned put on a stronger cord and pulled, it exploded. The next day another roof job, this one on the Ministry of Food. The device was minus drogue, so he could not attach a cord, he made a sling of adhesive tape and taking a risk attached it around the device. It was then lifted out of the roof, it exploded but caused little damage as it was clear of the roof.

 

Sidney Ernest Thorne
Sgt Sidney Ernest Thorne. GM
97 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th December 1940.No details of place of action.No further details at this time.Lt R.G. Walker.Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for action in France.No Further details at this time.Spr T.L. Walker.Posted in the London Gazette on the 9th November 1945.Awarded for action at Dieppe and Flushing.Spr Walker was one of the many RE’s trained by the Royal Navy as divers. 63 Port Construction and Repair Company, were clearing Dieppe Harbour. Walker was on the first recce unit to enter the harbour. He located and removed underwater mines, plus demolition charges.He also worked at Bergan-Op-Zoom, where his persistance enabled a large dregdger to be raised, for operational needs, this operation was carried out under extremly adverse conditions.At Beveland his hands became affected so badly that he had to go to hospital, this was caused by diving so often in ice packed waters.He was awarded the George Cross for, his persistently high standard of devotion of duty and courage in the face of silent and insidious enemy, performed under solitary and remote conditions with the ever present realisation that an accident or mistake would result in a terrible death.

 

George Anderson Wardrope
2205689 Sgt George Anderson Wardrope. GM
5 Bomb Disposal Company 

Posted in the London Gazette on the 24th March 1942.Awarded for actions at: German Hospital, Ritson Road, Hackney, London between the 4th to 6th October 1940 and at the GPO Sorting Office, Mount Pleasant, London, between the 16th to 25th November 1940.Sgt Wardrope in October 40 found himself working on a 250kg bomb dropped on the 27th September. It was located twenty yards from a railway line and ten from Hackney Hospital. The bomb was uncovered on the 5th and was found to be armed with a no 17 fuze, which was ticking. The hole was filled with sandbags to reduce the expected explosion, but on the 6th it was decided to move it to a safer location. The sandbags were removed and the bomb lifted and place on a truck, the fuze was still ticking. It was taken to a bomb cemetery, were it was found to be armed with two 17 fuzes both ticking.  It was left to detonate on its own.On the 16th November, he was at Mount Pleasant Post Office, at 02.05 in the morning. The bomb was a Category A. Normally it would be expected that a device such as this would explode within eighty hours. Ten days later they were still digging. It was eventually located eighty feet down and found to be a 1800kg, bomb (called Satan), this was the biggest in the Greman’s armoury.

 

John Peter Walton
120416 Lt John Peter Walton. GM
22 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 25th October 1941.Awarded for actions at: Gas Works, Romford, Essex on the 5th November 1940 and Tunnel Cement Works, Purfleet, Essex on the 12th March 1941.Lt Walton working in the Colchester area had dealt with one hundred bombs, many before the raid was over. On 5th November, he dealt with four bombs in twenty four hours all Category A.  Two of these were in the gas works, a third was inside a gas holder. It was a 250kg armed with a 17 and 50 fuze. He rendered it safe, the air conditions allowed him to work for only twenty minutes at a time. If the work wasnt dangerous enough, a air raid was under way at the time. Due to his actions minimum damage was caused and services resumed quickly.

 

J. Warren
Lt J. Warren. GM.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 25th August 1944.Awarded for actions in Kent.Cuckmere Haven on the 12th February 1944, Lt Warren was working on one of the coastal minefields. This was below a small cliff, this had eroded due to tidal action duuring the war. Many mines were to deep for detectors to locate them as they were on the shore under the fallen cliff. Warren personally made safe 550 mines in twelve hours.On the 7th April 44, Warren was given the task of clearing eight coastal minefields, around the Greatstone on Sea area. The minefield layout, or how many laid was not recorded, however the type of mines was known. Originally they were laid just below the surface, however due to tidal action and drifting sand they were from three and a half feet to thirteen feet below the surface. Existing detectors only worked to a depth of two feet. In spite of the difficulties Warren and his men completed the task.

 

Alwyn B Waters
Capt Alwyn B Waters. GM, MBE
23 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 10th November 1944.Awarded for actions in the UK.Capt Waters, was asked to assist Flt Lt Gillet with the disposal of a C Type mine. On arriving on site the mine was found to be only ten feet from the road. Waters as a experienced BD Officer was awre that the mine was fitted with a new type of fuze. He was not sure that his immunising equipment would work on this mine. He could have taken the easy course of calling in the Naval experts, however this would have meant a two hour delay, if during this delay the mine had exploded the damage and casualties would have been unthinkable. Therefore they got on with it, Gillett laid out a cord to remove the fuze and Waters ordered him to safety. Waters then applied a standard drill to remove the fuze, by the markings he knew this was booby trapped. Retiring one hundred yards he managed to remove the fuze, after waiting the set down safety period, he returned to recover the fuze. As he picked it up he found it was ticking, it then exploded badly injuring his foot.

 

F. White
L/Sgt F. White. GM

Posted in the London Gazette on the 2nd February 1945.Awarded for action in Brighton.No further details at this time.

Donald Alfred Wilkinson
154306 Capt Donald Alfred Wilkinson. GM
6 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th February 1941.Awarded for actions at: Eton College, 3rd September 40, Slough, 5th December 40, Wargrave, 10th December 40 and Arborfield, 19th December 40.Capt Wilkinson was tasked with two Category B, bombs which had fallen in Stoke Road, Slough, on the night of 3rd December. These were dealt with within half an hour of the report being recieved. Work on three others in this location was commenced three days later. One was exploded in situ at a twelve foot depth. Another was located again at twelve feet, it was armed with a 17 fuze. The decision was made to leave it till the next day. The squad departed and ten minutes later whilst Wilkinson stood fifty yards away briefing the night security, it exploded. The last was found at twelve feet and again was armed with a 17 fuze. This was damaged and could not be removed and it was ticking. The Police were told and the streets cleared, the bomb was placed on a truck and driven to Windsor Great Park, where with the help of Sgt Fletcher it was placed in an old bomb crater, it exploded shortly after. On the 3rd December bombs fell upon Eton, One went of, another went through the roof, coming to rest under the Colannade foundations of the Upper School. It was thought to have exploded due to damage caused. Wilkinson however checked it out. The headmaster Dr Elliot was informed, he wanted it removed straight away, he was informed it would taske three days as the building needed shoring up. He offered the assistance of some senior boys who had volunteered, this offer was declined. The building was evacuated and the Windsor/Eton/Slough roads diverted through Datchett. The bomb exploded on the night of the 4th.On the 9th December, Wilkinson recced a 250kg, his section started work the next day. When uncovered the bomb was found to be armed with a 17 fuze. A decision was made to detonate it in situ. He made up a charge and went down into the shaft. When the charge was placed he retired fifty yards to a safe location, the bomb exploded of its own making. For these actions he was awarded the George Medal.

 

James Williams
1903293 Spr James Williams. GM.
50/51 Bomb Disposal Sections

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11th March 1941.Awarded for an action at: Electricity Depot, Lyndhurst, Hampshire on the 14th August 1940.Spr Williams went to the Electricity Depot with Lt Charles. R. Wood, who commanded 50/51 Independent BD Sections. Where there was a 500kg bomb. The danger to civilians and property was high also the possible loss of electric power. They set to work, the fuze was a 17, long delay, which Lt Wood extracted, for research purposes. Both Spr Williams and Lt Wood recieved the George Medal. Williams was wounded at another incident on the 8th September.

 

Thomas James Williams
2326064 Sgt Thomas James Williams. GM
4 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 28th October 1941.Awarded for actions at: Norwich on the 28th October 1940 and Marconi Factory, Chelmsford, Essex on the 10th May 1941.Sgt Williams led  a working party to two Category A bombs, at a factory in Norwich. One was armed by a No 17 fuze and was ticking, Williams immunised the fuze before it exploded also the same result for the second. In May 1941, at the Marconi Factory, Williams and his section found the bomb buried by debris from other bombs, when uncovered it was found to be a 500kg with a ticking No 17 fuze.For these actions Williams was awarded the George Medal.

 

Ralph Willis
204212 Lt Ralph Willis. GM
Royal Engineers
Victoria Haulage Company Warehouse
Battersea
London
19/25 Jan 1941.

Posted in the London Gazette on the 17th February 1941.

On the night of 17/18th Jan 1943 a large bomb fell into the warehouse of Victoria Haulage Company at Battersea. Where it came to rest under a large lathe. The warehouse was full of new heavy machine tools from America. At all costs this machinery was not to be damaged. At the same time another large bomb was found with a new unidentified fuze. This fuze was found to be of a anti handling device. A Capt Carlyle removed the fuze and found it to be immune to developed procedures. Major Martin assisted by Lt Deane commenced work on their 500kg bomb, the fuze pockets were damaged so the fuzes could not be removed. So the filling plate was removed and steaming was started to remove the explosive filling. The risk of explosion using the standard steaming approach was deemed to dangerous, so the hose was hand feed into the explosive filling. It took the two officers all night of the 20th and till 08:30 the next morning to remove the filling. The conditions they worked in were akin to a Turkish bath, cramped and fifteen feet under ground, breathing in air containing particles of explosives which could damage their lungs. Major Martin received the George Cross and Lt Dean the George Medal.

 

C.R. Woods
Lt C.R. Woods. GM
50/51 Bomb Disposal Sections

Posted in the London Gazette on the 11th March 1941.Awarded for an action at: Electricity Depot, Lyndhurst, Hampshire on the 14th August 1940.Lt Charles. R. Wood, who commanded 50/51 Independent BD Sections, with Spr Williams went to the Electricity Depot. Where there was a 500kg bomb. The danger to civilians and property was high also the possible loss of electric power. They set to work, the fuze was a 17, long delay, which Lt Wood extracted, for research purposes. Both Lt Wood and Spr Williams received the George Medal.

 

Robert Alfred John Woods
167832 Lt Robert Alfred John Woods. GM
 Bomb Disposal Company

Posted in the London Gazette on the 24th August 1945.Awarded for actions at: Lee-on-Solent Airfield, Hampshire, Feb 43, Ringstead Bay, Weymouth, Dorset, Sept 43, Hurn Airfield, Hampshire, Jan 44, Kimmeridge and Bovington Camp, Dorset, May 44, Tilly Whim Caves, Swanage, Dorset, 3rd June 44, Chesil Beach, Abbotsbury, Dorset, Aug/Sept 44 and Penzance, Cornwall, Oct 44.

 

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REABD Annual Dinner – Leeds17th April 2018View MoreView More19th January 2018View MoreLatest NewsLatest EventinformationThe aim of the site is to provide a meetingpoint for all those involved in ExplosiveOrdnance Disposal (EOD) or in TacticalSearch whether serving or none servingmembers of the Royal Engineers.The site is a reference point for allactivities in the past and present inthe world of Bomb Disposal.

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